5 Reasons You Ought To Play Elder Scrolls Online

elderscrolls gold

elderscrolls gold

Several gamers are suspicious about the forthcoming Elder Scrolls Online game because it may be the first recreation while in the sequence. Players therefore are dreaming about another excellent concept, and have removed from Morrowind, all the way to Skyrim’s countries. Let’s have a look at five of the very best factors you would possibly wish to enjoy with this MMO.

If you have anything that Skyrim demonstrated us, it’s that Bethesda appreciates just how to produce a massive planet full of level and surprise. Here is the motive that Skyrim was not unable to arrived at living for players, and the same can be expected by us . The ElderScrolls gold will help you a lot in this game, in addition to many improvements for the world.

In prior activities, players have constantly needed to combat on their own to accomplish kill and missions huge beasts. However, this isn’t how MMOs function. There are some exciting gameplay mechanics put into get people to interact, instead of apart. There will really be synergies between abilities that are particular that whenever employed together by numerous participants, will generate a blow that is disastrous.

Just like every Parent Scrolls game, the story is definitely in-depth rather an experience and. Furthermore, as with every sport, before gaining power you will once more begin as being a prisoner and must free oneself. Ultimately, your identity is going to be fighting through PvP for that White-Gold Structure get to be and to try the Emperor. Now that you discover how the narrative begins and stops, you’ll must enjoy the overall game to learn how you’ll receive there!

While the hero of the tale, it is your task to aid these individuals by performing tasks and researching their approaches.

There are always a large amount of MMOs that have been pushed in order to keep the overall game running smoothly, to give up to the artwork aspect. On needing to do that, Online doesn’t plan, and you may assume exceptional artwork much like previous games.

Source: www.elderscrolls4u.com

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WildStar Gold

Wildstar gold farming

Wildstar gold farming

This week, we asked our friends at WildStar Central to help us outside for WildStar Wednesday. It creates every thing to open in precisely the same time. Playing Wildstar is a lot like looking into yesteryear. You don’t have any idea what wildstar is about until you’ve played the very first dungeon.

It is beginning, but WildStar has lots of potential. Time dedication is one of the most important features of WildStar. It’s also the only mmo I love crafting in. Undeniably wildstar is the greatest mmo to emerge in the last 8 years.

The WildStar Megaservers are now open for everybody! Wildstar will be loved by you if you like the style and also the music genre. Actually, you will find only two things holding WildStar gold back.A lot of us saw WildStar as an opportunity to get the group back together. I found the quests in Wildstar excruciatingly dull. WildStar is smart, not soft, and raucous, and if this design doesn’t click with you than WildStar likely won’t both, but it’s also a deep and open encounter that will definitely return as much as you care to put into it.

I am still a huge fan of WildStar and can continue to perform. Wildstar felt like it took the phrase Theme Park” MMO actually. No you could accuse of being boring to consider WildStar!

Here are the 9 decor things added to the database with screenshots. It does not turn WildStar into an action-rpg, but it does make the fighting much more satisfactory. For why I ceased playing with WildStar the immediate trigger was that I had to go.

Got to lv 32 in wildstar and am not fairly impressed with what I have observed up to now. The first Guild Wars gave a more performing to me -it’s-own- thing feel than Wildstar did. I’ve been debating whether or not I should resub to FFXIV, as I got almost all the way to 50 in that match (47), because I actually loved it. I really desired to spend the $1-5 only to compare it to Wildstar and see if I will find out what I find so off putting, as I feel as though I should definitely like it.

Wildstar armor is appearing since it appears the same on females and males dreary so far. Seriously though, perform a dungeon in wildstar and your whole opinion of the sport will shift. Anyone who’s not biased will inform you wildstar is without a doubt the most skill oriented mmo on the marketplace by a long shot.

Seems like WildStar did not pay in ad for a total review, GameSpot enough. At the beginning of every week, we enjoy to round up all the WildStar information from wildstarstock.com in the last week in one single position for you. For the following couple of days, we’ll go battlegrounds and arenas in WildStar over.
Today you can preorder WildStar prepared for launch to the third of June! It is difficult without mentioning Warcraft, to discuss any new MMORPG, and WildStar does not make that job any easier. WildStar is a MMO that infuses amazing stylized art with the most recent technology to produce a stunning visual experience.

wildstar

wildstar

WildStar First Look: The Mystery of Drusera as well as The Defile expect! The zombies and the horned snow monsters, the hoverboards and skyboats, the aloof robots and talking veg are all wrapped into a world that’s very much its own, regardless of how simple you may think it is to compare WildStar to Wow Such a comparison is a superficial one: where Warcraft aspires to the Warhammer universe’s chunky proportions and bulging structure, WildStar details its landscapes with bright green curlicues and grey-blue bubbles to depict grass and rocks. WildStar Uplink is a bi weekly dialog we maintain about philosophy, MMO design, and information with our supporters.

The Combat Techniques group stops by to respond to your conversation and discuss how we balance game play in WildStar. Jeremy Gaffney kicks off the Entire Year of WildStar with a blunt discussion about exactly how we want to raise the bar for the MMO style. We review the other day list of issues you are most excited about, & most worried about for WildStar, this week.

We’ll be sponsoring our first AMAA on the WildStar subreddit on Wednesday. Jeremy Gaffney discusses the way you can “play to pay” WildStar at launching. We challenged one to produce your finest WildStar Vines and you did not let’s down!

During Headstart, we’ll be playing with WildStar on Twitch with some of our favourite streamers. We are speaking about C.R.E.D.D., an in-game account piece that supplies 30 days of game time for WildStar. We are now a month out of the start of WildStar – it appears like an excellent time to look back on our first month of being an Actual Game.

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Gardens and People Essays

This is an occasional series of essays on gardens. The essay is a rather neglected form, but we think it important as it allows people to muse, to connect and express their thoughts on an idea that interests them. We welcome ideas for essays – please submit your garden essay!

Future Gardens
An essay by Jane Gibbon

We’re truly into the 21st century now and I wonder about the changes that’ll take place in gardens in years to come. It can hardly be expected to be business as usual for gardeners while the world and its problems pass by, and as the key issues …[Read full interview]

Why do we make gardens?
A contemplation by Twigs Way

Ask anyone why they garden and you will usually be met with a ready response. In my experience typical replies include…[Read full interview]

The Garden and the Exile

People who come to the UK as asylum seekers often need help in adjusting to life away from ‘home’, and making a garden can help them very much. Jane Gibbon has researched this area…[Read full article]

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Garden books

This is the book review section, where we are reviewing the most interesting of the new books and listing new publications.

Please email us your press releases on new publications for inclusion on this page.

Starting in March 2010, we are starting a new series: Vintage Books Reviews for all those well-thumbed older books we would never get rid of; books that cannot be replaced by those newly published; books that are simply loved and which we want others to read. Please do send us your ideas for reviews of vintage books!

Garden Books Reviews

We have classified our garden books reviews in 2 categories: Current Books Reviews and Vintage Books Reviews.

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Plants in the garden

Articles on plants: what they are, where they come from, who found them and what people feel about them. And pictures of plants.

There is a lot more to say about plants than simply how to grow them, and that is what this section is about. Martin Stimson, Head of the School of Horticulture Writtle College, Essex, writes a regular piece about plants that attract him. There will be photographic features with th photographer saying why she/he was attracted to photographing a particular plant, and articles about plant histories and making gardens with plants. Please contact us if you have anything to say about plants – how they affect you, what combinations work, why a plant causes a gasp of delight, or a breath-stopping moment – as they do….

We invite ideas for articles, to include pictures, about specific plants or groups of plants; anything except how to grow them – unless they are VERY exotic. There are plenty of magazines and websites for that. Please see ‘how to submit’ section.

Plants Articles

Due to the length of content and the many pictures we include, some articles may take more than a minute to download – please be patient – it is worth it!

 

Winter Jasmine – By Martin Stimson

This month, in his own ‘Winter’s Tale’, Martin travels to his birthplace for an encounter with a Winter Jasmine. On the way, he meets two common plants, the Hawthorn, and the Dogwood, which are often overlooked in preference for the extravagant and rare…. [Read full article]

Skimmia – by Miriam Heppell

I wanted plants that would survive shade, clay soil, provide year round interest and apart from a few spades of our homemade compost require no maintenance.The answer was Skimmia and the photographs that follow are my new plants. The Skimmia Genus originates from the woodlands of Japan… [Read full article]

Winter Bloomers – By Martin Stimson

Abandonment and neglect run against the very purpose of gardening, but to reward your spirit and increase the number of winter blooms Iris unguicularis needs to be largely ignored… [Read full article]

Autumnal Harmony – by Miriam Heppell

At this time of the year, the changing trees tend to take centre stage. For this portfolio however, I decided to look for Autumn colour on a smaller scale and particularly at harmonious planting, which can provide a wide palette of seasonal colour, late into the year. The photographs… [Read full article]

‘Blue Fingers’ – By Martin Stimson

“That’s disgusting!” comes the cry of a small child as they pick up the pods and squeeze its sides. “Yuk it’s slimy!” another one shouts. The pods in question resemble a handful of human fingers, now lying scattered on the floor… [Read full article]

Hampton Court Palace Flower Show – by Miriam Heppell

Hampton Court Flower Show is a wonderfully diverse festival of gardening, set in glorious surroundings. The garden themes ranged from self sufficiency to Shakespeare, incorporating community groups, colleges and charities alongside designers and artists… [Read full article]

Agave Abrupta

…This plant was about to flower at Kew… “The flower spikes are very large, reaching 10 metres or more. Its bright yellow-green flowers are pollinated by hummingbirds in the wild.” [Read full article]

Fremontodendron – By Martin Stimson

…The heat trapped in this space is considerable but perfect for the Fremontodendron Californicum or Flannel Bush I acquired 2 years after moving in…. [Read full article]

RHS Chelsea Flower Show – By Miriam Heppell

Visiting RHS Chelsea flower show gardens can be rather like looking at wedding hats; beautiful, exquisitely designed for one show and not intended for everyday…. [Read full article]

A Dated Garden Part 4 (last part) – By Jane Gibbon

Going back to basics is very much my choice when it comes to daylilies, that way I get a scented one, i.e. Hemerocallis lilioasphodelus (left)…[Read full article]

Bowled over by Tree Heaths – By Martin Stimson

A friend of mine used to turn wood on a lathe. He did this as a hobby, not for a living. Its an absorbing pastime, demanding concentration, skill and creativity. Any scrap of reasonably sized timber from any tree or large shrub would … [Read full article].

Late Spring Picture Portfolio – Miriam Heppell

Many of my images are taken with a macro lens. This enables me to take photographs at very close distances to the subject and reveal details that the casual eye may not see… [Read full article].

A Dated Garden, Part 3: The horticultural re-creation of a Victorian garden – by Jane Gibbon

As lavender is scented it’s one of my must-haves and, conveniently for my limited compost supply, it thrives in unfed soil… – Part 3 [Read full article]

Disappearing Dicentras – By Martin Stimson

After one of the coldest and seemingly longest winters for many years, and with spring looming, Martin Stimson outlines some very personal plant orientated reflections on Seasonality…. [Read full article].

Early Spring Picture Portfolio – Miriam Heppell

The extremely cold temperatures of late winter and early spring have not deterred those plants and flowers that began pushing their way through the hard, frozen ground… [Read full article].

A Dated Garden, Part 2: The horticultural re-creation of a Victorian garden – by Jane Gibbon

… if I’m only planting one rose that leaves me with space for a second climber. Or should that be a wall shrub, or a shrub that’s crown lifted? And I need some evergreen interest for winter. I have privet in mind… – Part 2 [Read full article]

Don’t just stand and stare – By Martin Stimson

Martin Stimson, Head of School of Horticulture Writtle College, continues his very personal accounts of plants that mean something to him. This month he writes about the Witch Hazels… [Read full article].

Winter Picture Portfolio – Miriam Heppell

After the symphony of Autumnal colours it would be easy to hang up my camera until Spring, but then I would mean miss, those bright and feisty plants that insist on giving a good show throughout the darker days…[Read full article].

A Dated Garden, Part 1: The horticultural re-creation of a Victorian garden – by Jane Gibbon

Jane Gibbon wanted a garden with plants true to the period of her house. This is the story of her research and the creation of the garden… – Part 1[Read full article]

A touch of the Himalayas in East Anglia – By Martin Stimson

As I drove towards the small Essex town of Kelvedon, I was reminded of a walled vegetable garden tended by my grandfather. He was a well respected Head Gardener for the Marquis and Marchioness of Huntley and he often… [Read full article]

Set light to your garden!

The change in colour of trees and shrubs in the countryside, and in our gardens gives me great pleasure each year. Yet for some people, they think it signals the end of the growing season. I view it differently….[Read full article]

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People in the garden

We are featuring articles about the people who make gardens, people who study gardens, and pictures of people in gardens. If you have an idea for any person for an interview, or have a good picture (hi-res please – only one at a time!), please contact us.

Interviews with ‘Garden People’

 

Due to the length of content and the many pictures we include, some articles may take more than a minute to download – please be patient – it is worth it!

Days in Jerusalem Botanical Gardens – Ruilang Huang (Emily)

I am very proud that I am the first Chinese scholar in Jerusalem botanical gardens. I worked there from Nov 2007 through May 2008. This is one of my greatest experiences abroad. I came to JBG… worked on the mapping and plant identification program… [Read article]

Jerusalem Botanical Gardens – Ori Frangman Sapir Photographs

The photographs of Ori Frangman Sapir, Head Scientist at Jerusalem Botanical Gardens.
[Read full article]

Hever Castle to Jerusalem

The Jerusalem Botanical Gardens was founded in by Michael Avishai , and is run with Israeli volunteers and visiting volunteers from all over the world. The UK Friends of the Jerusalem Botanical Gardens was started in the same year, and a horticultural relationship has been in place with Hever Castle for the last twenty-five years. [Read full article]

Jerusalem Botanical Gardens and their Friends

Started in 1956 on a site adjacent to the Hebrew University Campus in Givat Ram, the Gardens now contain more than 10,000 species of plants and flowers in an area of some 45 acres. Due to Jerusalem’s unique climate, plant species from all over the world thrive and grow, arranged in phyto-geographic sections… [Read full article]

Suki Urquhart’s Potager in France – Part 2

Last November, I interviewed Suki Urquhart : we talked about her new potager garden that she was setting up. Now she has sent a report and pictures of what astonishing progress her garden has made… [Read full article]

Profile of a Garden Designer: Heather Appleton

At BBC Gardeners World Live this year, (16th – 20th June at NEC Birmingham), NS&I will be sponsoring three gardens under the title ‘Growing Gardens Today’. One of the winners is Heather Appleton whose garden… [Read full interview]

Chloe Brown

“Chloe Brown has a fascinating background of visual influences… born in Kenya, and travelled in Africa and the Middle East before triaging in painting and print-making at the Glasgow School of Art and then at the English gardening School….” [Read full interview]

Interview with Christopher Woodward

“I was a gardener as a child, and bought plants with my pocket money, but my sister’s rabbit ate them all – so I was discouraged. I came to gardens through 18th century poetry and paintings, then, when I was researching my book In Ruins I saw…” [Read full interview]

Interview with Jeff Logsdon

Jeff Logsdon, [Head of the School of Design, Writtle College] came to Writtle College in 2003… and was attracted by the chance to develop Masters degrees in landscape architecture and garden design… [Read full interview]

Interview with Colleen Morris

Colleen Morris is very enthusiastic about gardens and their history. She is curious about all designs and the people behind them. Her book, Lost Gardens of Sydney is reviewed in the books section. I met her on her recent visit to the UK… [Read full interview]

Interview with Suki Urquhart – Part 1

Suki Urquhart is a Garden Designer and freelance Writer and had her own column in the Sunday Times for four years writing about people in their garden spaces. She has now moved to France where she is just starting up a new potager garden… [Read full interview]

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Garden Art

The garden, park or public place is a superb setting for art. Sculptures in stone, wood or clay; murals, ground pieces and sculptures in mosaics, ceramics, or paint; artistic seats, tables, summerhouses, gazebos and greenhouse; public art and land art. Art can be bought as reproductions, articles made for multiple sales or as single (bespoke) commissions.

gardens and people would like to hear from artists who work in the exterior environment. Please e-mail us giving:

  • your name
  • a brief description of your work and where you work
  • 2 photographs (jpg)

Garden Art Articles

We have classified our ‘Garden Art’ articles in 2 categories: Visual Art and Performance Art.

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Garden History

The story of gardens, of any gardens, is a fascinating one of time, fashion, philosophy and plants; and of the people involved: designers, artists, constructors; clients and their own ideas and desires. These stories are not only interesting, they need to be told, for reasons of preservation and conservation; for sharing knowledge amongst ourselves and for future generations.

gardens and people wishes to build up a stock of articles, stories, theses which throw light on the past and can be shared. If you have such knowledge please get in touch – see ‘how to submit’section.

Garden History Articles

Due to the length of content and the many pictures we include, some articles may take more than a minute to download – please be patient – it is worth it!

The Gardens of Penshurst Place – by Jane Gibbon

You’ll not find the gardens of Penshurst Place featured prominently in garden history books, and no famous designer names come readily to mind when they’re mentioned; nor are they home to any block-buster man-made features, but this is far from saying… [Read full article].

Bees in Gardens – by Penelope Walker

Man’s first interactions with honey bees (Apis species) involved harvesting honey combs from nests in woods and rocks, as shown in prehistoric rock art found in Spain, Africa and India. Gradually, in some areas, people learned how to tend the bees in these natural nests, and finally they developed the skills… [Read full article].

Miss Ima Hogg and her gardens at Bayou Bend (Houston, Texas) – by Bella D’Arcy Reed

… It therefore unsurprising that Ima Hogg became interests in landscape design and gardening, as she believed that gardens and working in gardens was an antidote to depression. A fact that been researched and proven in the decades since… [Read full article].

Chiswick House Gardens Restoration – By Bella D’Arcy

Chiswick House Gardens is a site of international importance both as the birthplace of the English Landscape Movement, and as the setting for one of the most beautiful houses in London… [Read full article].

Bernard Lassus unbuilt garden – By Jill Sinclair

In the third article of an occasional series for Gardens and People, landscape historian Jill Sinclair looks at the extraordinary proposal by French designer Bernard Lassus to reinvent the Jardin des Tuileries in the heart of Paris… [Read full article].

Design Special: Gardens that were never built

Back into place: the reawakening of a long-lost Capability Brown design…[Read full article].

The Gardens of Frances Evelyn, Countess of Warwick

The Story will be presented on the website in three parts:

  • Part 1: The Countess’s Gardens by Bella D’Arcy.
  • Part 2: The Designer of the formal gardens, Harold Peto by Robin Whalley – available in May 10.
  • Part 3: The Discoverers and Conservers, by the present owners, Brian and Diana Creasey – available in July 10.

Historic Restoration in the USA – by Marion Pressley

Marion Pressley is a Leader at Pressley Associates, based in Cambridge Massachusetts, USA. The company has been winning awards since 1977, their latest, Outstanding Design in Landscape Architecture … [Read full article].
Related article: Protecting Cultural Landscapes.

Fruit in 17th Century Gardens – by Sandra Nicholson

When one thinks historically of fruit in the garden, it is likely that the image conjured up will be the walled kitchen garden of the 19th century but two centuries earlier fruit was a major component of the pleasure garden… [Read full article].

The Medieval Garden: Prebendal – By Mike Brown

The Prebendal Manor medieval gardens are the subject of a current Time Team and were also featured in the series ‘Royal Gardeners’, introduced by Alan Titchmarsh, who described the gardens as a “stunning example of a recreated medieval garden”… [Read full article].

The Good Life: exhibition at the Garden History Museum

In 2009, ‘The Good Life’ became a mass movement for the first time since the late 1970s, when the sit-com of the same name juxtaposed self-sufficiency with the tedium of the ‘rat race’… [Read full article].

Gardens that were never built – by Jill Sinclair

Most of us would give almost anything to have our gardens laid out by one of the great designers – a Humphry Repton terrace perhaps, or a Gertrude Jekyll flower border… [Read full article].

Further Garden History Resources

 

You can find out more about Garden History on these websites:

  • The Garden History Society
  • The Historic Garden Foundation

 

About Gertrude Jekyll

Gertrude Jekyll was a remarkable woman, a gardener, artist and designer. Find her in Bella D’Arcy’s book, Gardens of Divine Imitation and on this website:

  • www.gertrudejekyll.co.uk
Copyrights

Please respect the copyright of the photographers and the writers. If you wish to reproduce articles and/or pictures anywhere except for purely educational purposes, you must email us to ask permission – please fill in ‘Per

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Garden Design

Garden design is not a new profession, but it has grown enormously over the last 20 years as more and more people see the worth of having their outside space designed by a professional. Not only private gardens but also gardens for public use, schools or for particular communities are now designed by garden designers and landscape architects.

gardens and people is interested in all genres of garden design and want to feature designs which are distinctive and beautiful, contemporary or traditional, big or small. If you are a designer or design practice and have gardens of distinctive design (architecturally and/or plant-wise), please e-mail us giving:

  • your name
  • a brief description of your work and where you work
  • 2 photographs (jpg)

 

Garden Design Articles

Due to the length of content and the many pictures we include, some articles may take more than a minute to download – please be patient – it is worth it!

Designing within a Community

Working with a group to design a garden is one of the most exciting projects to undertake… [Read full article]

Interview with Andrew Fisher Tomlin

Fisher Tomlin is a company which celebrated its 20th anniversary last year (2009). We asked Andrew to look back to the beginning…… [Read full article].

Gardens that were never built – by Jill Sinclair

Most of us would give almost anything to have our gardens laid out by one of the great designers – a Humphry Repton terrace perhaps, or a Gertrude Jekyll flower border… [Read full article].

Gardens for people with disabilities

Astute observations and an informed approach go further than official guidelines when designing private or public places for disabled users…. [Read full article]

Profile of a Garden Designer: Thomas Hoblyn

Thomas Hoblyn is a Garden Designer who knows about plants… He has also studied plants in their natural habitats around the world… He is also interested in the gardens of the Renaissance and the Islamic world, and in contemporary land art… [Read full article] – More about Thomas Hoblyn

 

Garden Design Articles: working with schools

Designing with schools

Some schools will only want advice on planting up an area or on starting a school garden… involve the children in thinking, planning and in extending their creativity as well as in learning about plants and gardening… [Read full article]

Design for a Courtyard or Infant and Nurery School

The Brief: to convert a very bare, bleak courtyard in the middle of the school… and to establish a courtyard garden for the use of all the children to sit and to work… [Read full article]

The Echo Public Garden, made with Schools

In the 2004 Juliet Martin, Arts Development Officer for Chelmsford Borough Council approached garden designer Bella D’Arcy to discuss a project involving schools to be part of the community programme… [Read full article]

The Elements Garden, with a Junior School

The brief for the garden… was to create a contemporary garden… working with Junior School children. The concept for the garden was to be the four elements – fire, air earth and water…. [Read full article]

A Garden for GCSE Art

The idea for a garden design project was initially prompted by the desire amongst the school community for a lasting memorial to a member of staff… [Read full article]

A quiet Garden

In 2008, a project was discussed for a quiet garden… It was agreed that a garden should be made on the theme of St Patrick’s journey… [Read full article]

 

If you need to find a garden designer please go to: www.sgd.org.uk.

For more talk about gardens, visit thinkinGardens.

Copyrights

Please respect the copyright of the photographers and the writers. If you wish to reproduce articles and/or pictures anywhere except for purely educational purposes, you must email us to ask permission – please fill in ‘Permissions’ in your email Subject line.

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WHAT’S NEW IN THE JANUARY UPLOAD

  • Gardens of Care: charities providing gardens and gardening care, plus designer profiles.
    • Gardens for Care: Thrive
    • Gardens for Care: Greenfingers
    • Gardens for Care: Designer Profile: Amanda Patton, designer of a greenfingers garden.
  • Garden History:
    • Miss Ima Hogg and the Bayou Bend Gardens, Houston.
    • Bees in Gardens: Traditional Bee-Keeping in Britain by Penelope Walker, Voluntary Curator, IBRA Bee Boles Register.
  • Miriam Heppell’s Photographic Portfolio: Skimmia.
  • Martin Stimson: Back to Basics in Suburbia – the cornus and the hawthorn.
  • Book Reviews:
    • Helena Attlee: Italy’s Private Gardens
    • Gillian Mawrey and Linden Groves: The gardens of English Heritage
    • Judith B Tankard: Beatrix Farrand: Private Gardens, Public Landscapes
  • MORE ACCESSIBLE GARDENS

Any ideas for articles are verry welcome: if you have a suggestion, please let us know.

NEXT UPLOAD: end of March 2011.
Deadline for articles: 14th March 2011.

To receive e-mail notice of new uploads
please contact belladarcy@gardensandpeople.co.uk

Accessible Gardens

The sister-website, www.accessiblegardens.org.uk will be launched at the beginning of April 2011.

This will have articles of interest to older gardeners and people of all ages with disabilities: it will include reports on gardens open to the public written by disabled people to be of benefit to other garden visitors.

There will also be articles on making gardens and gardening accessible to children, young people, the community and anyone who is disadvantaged in any way.

We want to know about any community or school gardens, and especially what a particular gardens means to you. Please contact Bella D’Arcy Reed.

A ‘not-for-profit’ venture

gardens and people is a ‘not-for-profit’ venture: all articles are FREE to download and any profit made from projects such as books sales will go to fund the next projects – ie the money from Gardens of Divine Imitation will fund the CD of Sheila Dewey’s play Bumps about Gertrude Jekyll and Edwin Lutyens, and so on.

There are lots of ideas in the pipeline for books and CDs, working with writers, photographers, designers, musicians and artists. Please check this site regularly!

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